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EMERGENCY LIGHTING

ARE EMERGENCY LIGHTS A REQUIRMENT?

In the UK, emergency lighting regulations are outlined in the British Standard BS 5266-1:2016 "Emergency lighting. Code of practice for the emergency lighting of premises".
 

The standard specifies the minimum requirements for the provision of emergency lighting in most premises other than private dwellings. It covers the location and type of emergency lighting required, as well as the duration of illumination and testing and maintenance requirements.
 

The types of emergency lighting required can include escape route lighting, open area lighting, high-risk task area lighting, and standby lighting. The duration of illumination required can vary depending on the type of premises and the level of risk.
 

It's important to note that emergency lighting should be regularly tested and maintained to ensure it is functioning correctly in the event of an emergency. The testing and maintenance regulations are also outlined in BS 5266-1.

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WHAT IS MAINTAINED AND NON MAINTAINED?

Emergency lights come in 2 different types, maintained and non maintained. It is important to know when testing as some areas require one over the other. 

Non-maintained emergency lights are designed to operate when the buildings main power fails. The lighting is linked to a battery and to the buildings lighting supply, so these lights remain off while the mains power is working and will only turn on when the power is lost.

Maintained emergency lighting does the same as non-maintained but is doubled up as a building's primary lighting source, connected to the mains and linked to a chargeable battery. The light will remain on at all times but when the power is lost from the mains the battery kicks in to keep the light illuminated. 

Both types of fittings usually have a coloured LED to indicate the Battery is being charge from the supply. 

DO EMERGENCY LIGHTS NEED TESTING?

Emergency lighting testing requirements stipulate that emergency lighting must be maintained and regularly tested in the same way as other emergency equipment. Each light should be identified and have a location identity for recordkeeping.

While there are no specific laws outlining when emergency lighting needs to be expected, it is best practice to inspect and test all exit lights and emergency lighting every six months. This includes exit signs and emergency lights that are working and don't appear to require maintenance or replacement.

We can help with design, installation, testing and maintenance. 

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With over 18 Years experience in Design, Installation & Testing in the Domestic, Commercial and Industrial Sectors. 

Are you ready for a free Design and Quotation? 

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